Migrants Demand Trump Admin. Either Pay Them $50,000 Or Let Them Into Country

Tempers are running hot with members of the migrant caravans who have been cooling their heels in Tijuana while U.S. and Mexican authorities determine their fate.

With President Trump having already dug in his heels over what would be an unprecedented invasion of the southern border as well as a national security threat, a number of the stalled Central Americans have come up with a new strategy.

Blackmail and extortion.

At least two groups of organized migrants have decided to march on the U.S. consulate in the Mexican border city where they have issued their demands that Trump either quickly allow them to enter the country or pay them  $50,000 to turn around and go back home.

The groups accused the Trump administration of violating international law by not simply rolling out the red carpet for them.

FOX 11 Los Angeles

@FOXLA

Two groups of Central American migrants marched to the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana Tuesday with a list of demands, and one group delivering an ultimatum to the Trump administration: either let them in the U.S. or pay them $50K each to go home, a report said. http://bit.ly/2SIU1PU 

Report: Migrant group demands Trump either let them in or pay them each $50G to turn around

(FOX NEWS) – Two groups of Central American migrants marched to the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana on Tuesday with a list of demands, with one group delivering an ultimatum to the Trump administration:…

foxla.com

95 people are talking about this

Two groups of Central American migrants marched to the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana on Tuesday with a list of demands, with one group delivering an ultimatum to the Trump administration: either let them in the U.S. or pay them $50,000 each to go home, a report said.

Among other demands were that deportations be halted and that asylum seekers be processed faster and in greater numbers, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.

The first group of caravan members, which included about 100 migrants, arrived at the consulate around 11 a.m. Alfonso Guerreo Ulloa, an organizer from Honduras, said the $50,000 figure was chosen as a group.

“It may seem like a lot of money to you,” Ulloa told the paper. “But it is a small sum compared to everything the United States has stolen from Honduras.”

View image on Twitter

View image on Twitter

San Diego Union-Tribune

@sdut

Migrant groups march to U.S. consulate in Tijuana demanding reparations http://dlvr.it/QtQC03 

53 people are talking about this

Additional details per the San Diego Union-Tribune, “Migrant groups march to U.S. consulate in Tijuana demanding reparations”:

The first group demanding action, numbering about 100, arrived at the U.S. Consulate at about 11 am Tuesday. The migrants said they were asking that the Trump Administration pay them $50,000 each or allow them into the U.S.

When asked how the group came up with the $50,000 figure, organizer Alfonso Guerrero Ulloa of Honduras, said they chose that number as a group.

“It may seem like a lot of money to you,” Ulloa said. “But it is a small sum compared to everything the United States has stolen from Honduras.”

The group’s letter criticized American intervention in Central America. They gave the U.S. Consulate 72 hours to respond. They said they had not decided what to do if their demands were not met.

“I don’t know, we will decide as a group,” Ulloa said.

The second letter, delivered around 1:20 p.m., came from a separate group of caravan members asking for the U.S. to speed up the asylum process. Specifically, the group asked U.S. immigration officials to admit up to 300 asylum seekers at the San Ysidro Port of Entry each day.

Currently, officials admit between 40 and 100 asylum seekers. The group of migrants say the slow pace violates American and international laws that call for an immediate process, and places vulnerable migrants at risk.

“In the meantime, families, women and children who have fled our countries continue to suffer and the civil society of Tijuana continue to be forces to confront this humanitarian crisis, a refugee crisis caused in great part by decades of U.S. intervention in Central America,” the letter states.

The second letter came from a group of about 50 migrants, including about 15 who participated in a hunger strike that also demanded a swifter U.S. asylum process. The non-profit Pueblo Sin Fronteras helped organize the delivery of the second letter.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s